Teach in Japan - Teaching abroad while having a family???

by Nick

Teach in Japan - Teaching Abroad while having a family?



My main question deals with bringing my wife and children to live overseas. Are there schools or employers in Japan (or any other Asian country) that would have housing to accomodate a large family?

I came across your website and decided to ask some questions. My name is Nick and I have a BS in Occupational Safety and Health from Columbia Southern University. I am married and my wife and I have 5 daughters (ages 14, 12, 9, 7 and 5). I have been interested in learning more about teaching English overseas (Preferable in an Asian Country and more specifically Japan, Taiwan). I do not have a TESOL certificate, although I would not have a problem in completing this). The brunt of my questions and concerns would be in regards to my family. My wife homeschools our children, so the cost of schooling overseas would not be an issue. I have many years of corportate training experience, so while I dont have experience in teaching children, I feel that this is
something that I would love to do (afterall, having a large family does prepare one for the challenges of teaching children).
I look forward to getting everyone's thoughts...Nick

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Jul 10, 2015
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Your style is so unique NEW
by: Anonymous

Your style is so unique compared to many other people as a writer for
Jan 27, 2011
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by: Anonymous

You mention homeschooling. In Japan, the law seems to make it illegal, but there are various interpretations of the law in practice and it might depend on where you live. If you do a web search "homeschooling in japan" there are some helpful sites.
A teaching certificate is a good thing to have here, but where you got it doesn`t seem very important. There are residential courses and online and again it doesn`t seem to matter which one you have for employment here. I personally would have preferred a residential course, but had to take one online. The course was good for what it was. Having no teaching experience, I found it very helpful. The same company also had residential courses in Thailand that might be a good option.
Anyway, the best advice I can give is to do a lot of research. Making such a major move with a wife and five children is not the same as popping over here single. Lastly, can you really support your family on a teacher`s wage here?
Good luck to you Nick.
Mike

Jan 27, 2011
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So many things to consider
by: Anonymous

Hi Nick,
Kevin has a point in saying that the countryside/suburbs would be a better choice for a large family. You have to consider though, that employment opportunities would be very limited in the countryside. You might think that if you have a job offer before moving there it would be OK, but consider that you will now be very dependent on that one employer - for better or worse. Also, as Kevin mentioned, the housing is smaller here. I live in the area Kevin mentioned (Kamakura) and it is NOT inexpensive. Relative to central Tokyo yes, but not relative to the US or Canada. I have a family of five and we live in a house of only 53 square meters - 2 small bedrooms and a small combination kitchen/living/dining room that wouldn`t be considered large enough for any one of those functions in the US. We pay the equivalent of $1300 US per month. Not to mention the move in costs. Here it is common to pay 1 month rent gift money to the owner, 2 months deposit (only a portion of which will be returned regardless of the property condition when you leave), and a commission to the realtor of 1 month. So, 4 months rent just to move in. And, if you're lucky you will get less than a months rent back when you leave. Some of these charges might be avoided if your employer arranges housing for you though. I realize that I sound discouraging, but I don't mean to be. I only want to give you some accurate info from a family man. If you are willing to really go the countryside, rents do decrease but not as much as you might think. If the house is large it will be old and uninsulated. If it is newer it probably is not going to be large and may still be uninsulated. All this being said, I still like it here. Ultimately, home ownership is the only way to go, but real estate in my area is very expensive. In the countryside you can find some good deals though. I do think that if you are accustomed to the countryside you can have a better quality of life and possibly a better experience living in Japan. The issue being employment opportunities.
..more to follow...

Jan 25, 2011
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Thanks, Kevin
by: Anonymous

Kevin: Thank you very much for your comments. I was beginning to think that maybe my dream was going to be a pipe dream. You mention living in a more rural area, which honestly is what we would be more interested in doing. A smaller, more picturesque location sounds wonderful. With all of that said, I have no idea where to look or even who to contact to explore this dream. Also, which company is the best to obtain any certifications that would enhance the job search. Any more information you can provide would definately be appreciated.

Nick

Jan 25, 2011
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On a Family of 7 Coming to live in Asia
by: Anonymous




Hi Nick,

If you and your family would be willing to live in the way of the country you move to, I don`t think it would be a problem. That said, apartments and even houses tend to be small in
most of Asia, unless you live outside a big city.
If you are hoping everyone can have their own room, I think that is very difficult in Asia unless you are coming with a lot of money to spend on rent.


I can only comment in detail on Japan, though I have been to Taiwan and had a good friend who lived and taught there many years ago.

I would think you could get a large place to live
but it would be in a small town or a suburb.
A few hours from Tokyo you can rent a nice old
Japanese house near the ocean (in Kamakura) which
is a lovely place, and it wouldn`t cost so much.

A friend of mind had a small house with a garden.
But you would probably all be sleeping in one
room, on futons, on a tatami mat floor.

You would need to show employers some training
at least, or experience in teaching children I would think. That corporate background won`t be much of a help unless you would be trying for
a managerial position at a school. So I would
get some online training that gives a certificate for completion.

Your family could be a blessing in a way. Some schools would love to have Nick`s "foreign invasion," LOL, come to their area, and help to
encourage the locals to study English. The family could be a huge plus for your job search.
You might want to consider teaching out of your home as well if your wife were willing, and the
institute that hired you didn`t mind.

Much to think about and much to read about Nick.
Get to that local library, and read all you can at our site too. Good luck with it!

Kevin Burns


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