Waseda University Implements 5 Year Term Limit for Part-time Teachers!

by Kevin R Burns
(Kanagawa, Japan)

Waseda University Implements 5 Year Term Limit for Part-time Teachers!




Employment contracts for Part-time Lecturers and Visiting Faculty will be limited to a maximum of 5 consecutive years after April 1, 2013, according to Waseda`s official letter to employees.


Don`t universities realize they are shooting themselves in the foot by letting good teachers go? I don`t agree with this new law, as it affects part-time university teachers, however, the universities are handling it in a very immature and counter-productive way, if they truly care about the quality of their teachers.


Waseda will also limit part-time lecturers to 4 periods per week.

Good luck getting good teachers for such a meager offering of work Waseda!

Perhaps now is the time for part-timers to truly rise up and oppose the way we are being treated by the government (by implementing this new law) which doesn`t suit the university situation, and oppose the universities - some of which are treating part-time teachers like so many cattle.

"What makes it worse is that from next school year 2014 all part timers who work for Waseda will be limited to 4 periods a week, which means this could be my last year at that school since I work many periods a week."

-said one Waseda University teacher


Is it any wonder that few Japanese universities are ranked in the top 100 of universities in the world?

Comments for Waseda University Implements 5 Year Term Limit for Part-time Teachers!

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Apr 14, 2015
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True information is shared NEW
by: Paris T. Wooten

I feel really fortunate tohave used your webpage and look forward to so many more fun momentsreading here. Thanks a lot again for a lot of things.


Great work

Apr 06, 2013
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Help
by: John K

The Tokyo City Hall has a free labor consultation service. They provide English & Chinese translators. Under: 外国人労働相談 there is a list of offices and times that they have translators available.

http://www.hataraku.metro.tokyo.jp/s...dan/index.html


I recommend Tokyo Public Law Office's Foreigner Service section. They charge about 5000 yen for a 30 minute consult.

http://www.t-pblo.jp/fiss/index.html


Mar 28, 2013
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The General Union vows to Help Part-time University Teachers
by: Anonymous

The General Union vows to Help Part-time University Teachers, with this new labour law

What can you do if you discover your employer is planning to introduce a contract limit at the beginning of the 2013 academic year?

If you’re a union member, follow these steps. If you’re not yet a union member, join first and then follow these steps to join our fight back and protect your job.

1. With your current employer: If you are given a contract for next year which states any contract renewal limits,



call us immediately.


Mar 27, 2013
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Victory to Interac?
by: Anonymous

This may be yet another victory for Interac and teacher recruitment agencies like them. One reader pointed out, that the universities haven`t thought through how they are going to interview and hire new teachers.

Maybe they have.

By using Interac or an agency like them, the quality of teachers will go down, but the work of interviewing and hiring will be of no concern to the universities,...that is until some crisis occurs involving a teacher who is not loyal to the university, but works for interac.

-dating students, or some other unsavory behavior.


Mar 27, 2013
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Very Discriminating
by: Anonymous

If Waseda has a teacher's labor union, they should respond to this unilateral policy change on the grounds of unfair treatment. Part-time teachers are already on a one year contract, so there never has been any guarantee of how many koma p.t. teachers will be given one year or the next or whether p.t. teachers will be given another 1 year contract. Nevertheless, contracts are generally extended to teachers who haven't reached retirement age and have fulfilled all the the general policies and requirements of each individual department (ex: 1. ability to teach effectively in accordance with guidelines and work well with students; 2. having a good record of fulfilling adminstrative duties such as turning in grades on time, attending annual meetings, etc.; 3. working well with full-time faculty and administrative staff; 4. maintaning a continued committment to academics; etc.). Based on a fair review of all p.t. teachers irrespective of their age, race, religion, etc., departments make decisions on a year to year basis on whether or not to offer an extended contract. However, now Waseda is adopting a policy that says teachers must retire for at least 6 months at the end of 5 years without cause. Among other things, this means that more qualified teachers will go elsewhere where their hard work and effort will be recognized, leaving behind those p.t. teachers who are just happy to find work period, even if they know they will lose their job after 5 years. This also causes more work in the long run for full-time teachers who have to go through the hiring process to fill more vacant positions. It may also mean that some p.t. teachers who know they only have 1 or 2 years left at Waseda will quit their job half way through the year when something better comes along, as they lose any incentive to remain loyal to Waseda given such a discriminatory hiring practice. It also means that Waseda doesn't have to pay p.t. teachers any long term benefits as they do for f.t. teachers who work longer than 5 years. The list goes on and on.

Mar 27, 2013
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Discouraging Rule
by: Mary

I can see where this would be a most discouraging rule to most part time professors. Is the motivation to consolidate to having more full time professors?

Do the Japanese universities use the tenure system that many schools use in the USA? I wonder how the rule will affect that?

Thank you for your posts. It is interesting to see what is going on in the world of how to teach English in Japan!

Have a great week.

Mary

Mar 27, 2013
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Ongoing problem:
by: Anonymous

Isn't this an ongoing situation?? I seem to recall David Auldwinkle writing about this same problem years ago. This is a historical problem for Japan. Very narrow minded, but Japan is not the only place things like this happen!

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